Blogging

What are Your 2022 Blogging Goals? Here are Mine!

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Do you set a list of accomplishments you want to make each year for your site? I do, and so here are my 2022 blogging goals.

It would be difficult to argue that the pandemic did not affect web traffic. For much of the first half of 2020, many websites reported more traffic. You can blame that on breaking news about the pandemic and how people dealt with it. You can also blame that — potentially — on people working from home and taking a bit more time to surf without their boss looking over their shoulder.

Either way, many of us saw unusually high web traffic in the first half of 2020. By the second half of 2020, many sites saw traffic return to normal.

That helped web numbers in 2020.

But it did not help so much in 2021, since that year was competing against a higher-than-average amount of traffic from the year before.

I recently posted my annual look at my blogging stats from 2021.

I reported a drop in page views year-to-year in 2021. But you can definitely base that on the higher-than-normal page views in the first half of 2020. I’m hoping that problem will correct itself by the end of this year.

Unique visitors and new visitors both increased in 2021, which I took as a good sign.

One of the other stats, though, represents one of the biggest goals for this year.

My 2022 blogging goals

There are two critical goals I have for this year.

The first goal might sound familiar if you’ve read these yearly updates before. But one of my goals is becoming more consistent with completing posts ahead of schedule. Depending on the week, sometimes I manage to get a full week ahead. Other weeks, I’m still writing a post the day it goes up.

My work schedule at the real job has been insane, and that has been affecting my sleep schedule and my blog productivity. So I’m working to prevent that from happening in the future!

The second goal, though, deal with one of those disturbing stats: the home page bounce rate.

Bounce rate refers to the percentage of people who land on one page of your blog and then leave your site from that same page. In other words, it measures how many people only look at a single page.

Depending on the page of your site, your bounce rate could be misleading. If you provide useful information and someone reaches your site from Googling that information, they may read it on that page, then exit your site. That would elevate the bounce rate for that page. But if people are reaching your site because of a search engine, that’s a good thing. If you’re providing answers they need, that’s also a good thing.

Your home page bounce rate, though, should be lower than your site’s overall bounce rate. That’s an indication that people reach your front page and find something compelling to click on. If your front page bounce rate goes up, that’s a bad sign.

Mine did. So one goal is to bring it back down. I have a few ideas in mind, but it’s a matter of what I can pull off quickly.

We’ll see how that goes. Hopefully by next January, I’ll be talking about my success in getting my home page bounce rate back down!

Have you set blogging goals for this year? What are yours?

the authorPatrick
Patrick is a Christian with more than 30 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.