Faith

How I Didn’t Spend Memorial Day

I recently “liked” a group on Facebook called “The Christian Left.” I did so mostly because I’m seeing the Christian Right be more and more wrong a good deal of the time when it comes to dealing with others. I also believe in looking at both sides of a coin.

One of the group’s posts on Memorial Day really shocked me:

As we honor the fallen this Memorial Day, who simply followed orders and carried out their duty, let us also DIShonor the chickenhawks [sic] who avoided service, but send (or want to send) our young men and women to die. That includes YOU Dick Cheney and Mitt Romney!

Really?

On Memorial Day, we need to make this another typical day of political posturing?

Ironically, the soldiers we honor on Memorial Day gave their lives so we could have these tired old arguments. But that isn’t what Memorial Day is about in my book.

I left them a response, but curiously enough, it appeared to have disappeared later in the day.

Here, roughly, is what I said:

“Sorry, but I am not willing to divide the spotlight that’s supposed to be shining on our war dead in order to DIShonor anyone today. That’s not what Memorial Day is about. Today, the focus should be on those who gave their lives protecting our freedom. And that should be the ONLY focus.

That’s as close as I can remember, but that was the general idea.

The fact that what I actually wrote is no longer showing up tells me that “the Christian Left” is wrong, too.

Maybe I need to start a “Christian Middle” group.

5 Comments

  1. There is no excuse whatsoever for anyone trying to use Memorial Day to further their political agenda.  I’m sure there are those on the right doing the same thing, but in this particular example it was clear that the OP was interested in making an anti-Republican statement.  While I agree that there is plenty of blame to share with ALL parties on various issues, it takes a particularly vile human to try to wrap his/her political agenda in the bodies of our dead soldiers.
     
    Oh how I would love the opportunity to meet face-to-face with that individual and explain very clearly that the only reason he/she can practice both religion and freedom of speech is because of the sacrifices of the very soldiers Memorial Day is intended to honor.  What a schmuck!

  2. Yes, you are right. The left can be just as wrong as the right and I think that we all should strive for the middle where all views are welcome, where we can build consensus.
     
    Somehow compromise and tolerance has become ugly words.They have been replace by uncompromising ideology on both sides.

      1. @patricksplace
        Let me clarify what I said, I think the vast majority of people are open minded. As an “out” trans-woman I have had only one person treat me bad in the 12 years that I have been out in public. That also includes my travel in most of the Atlantic states.
         
        Since 2005 I have been working to pass the gender inclusive anti-discrimination law here in Connecticut. The way the committees voted illustrates the shift in politics toward the extremes even here in “blue” Connecticut. The first year we introduced the bill in 2006 the Judiciary Committee vote was 28 Yea, 8 Nay. In 2007 the Judiciary Committee vote was 29 Yea, 4 Nay, the Senate voted 30 – 4 and because of time restraints it was never voted on in the House. It was a bipartisan bill that had strong support from both sides of the isle. Then went we finally passed the bill in 2011 the votes were, the Judiciary Committee voted 27 – 14, the House 77 – 62 and the Senate the vote was 36 – 19. However, most the legislators were the same who voted originally for the bill and when I was talking to one Republican legislator he said he was still for the bill but was going to vote against it because of the party.

      2. @patricksplace
        Let me clarify what I said, I think the vast majority of people are open minded. As an “out” trans-woman I have had only one person treat me bad in the 12 years that I have been out in public. That also includes my travel in most of the Atlantic states.
         
        Since 2005 I have been working to pass the gender inclusive anti-discrimination law here in Connecticut. The way the committees voted illustrates the shift in politics toward the extremes even here in “blue” Connecticut. The first year we introduced the bill in 2006 the Judiciary Committee vote was 28 Yea, 8 Nay. In 2007 the Judiciary Committee vote was 29 Yea, 4 Nay, the Senate voted 30 – 4 and because of time restraints it was never voted on in the House. It was a bipartisan bill that had strong support from both sides of the isle. Then went we finally passed the bill in 2011 the votes were, the Judiciary Committee voted 27 – 14, the House 77 – 62 and the Senate the vote was 36 – 19. However, most the legislators were the same who voted originally for the bill and when I was talking to one Republican legislator he said he was still for the bill but was going to vote against it because of the party.

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Patrick is a Christian with more than 28 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.