Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Grammar

Omarosa Tapes? Where was the ‘Tape Recorder?’

I don’t know about you, but I’m getting tired of hearing about the so-called Omarosa Tapes one former reality-show star supposedly made of another.

Where are these Omarosa Tapes? I’m not talking about actual recordings of conversations inside the White House.

I’m talking about the actual physical tapes on which the recordings were made.

You see, Omarosa Manigault Newman reportedly made the secret recordings of President Donald Trump and other high-ranking officials. Some have made it clear the recordings were made on a smartphone.

This Huffington Post article, however, states Newman has a “stash of video in addition to audiotapes.

Others have joked that Omarosa and her “tape recorder” could spell trouble for the Trump Administration.

If there was no tape recorder and no audio tape cassettes, (and no old-style reel-to-reel recorder with those kinds of tape stock), then there are no Omarosa tapes.

There’s no tape involved at all.

Yes, I’m nitpicking about the whole ‘tape’ thing.

But let’s at least try to be accurate, shall we? Especially when we have a president who whines that everything he disagrees with must be “fake news.”

By the 1970s, much of television production was transitioning from film to tape. That didn’t stop people from referring to shows on videotape having been “filmed.”

To this day, in fact, I still hear people talking about reporters “filming” their story. Local television reporters haven’t done things on film for at least 40 years, depending on the individual communities.

Yet we were still using the term film when we really should have been using the term tape.

Now, with digital recording, we’re following the same tradition, saying we’re “taping” when we’re recording a digital file.

I guess it’s because “recording a digital file” takes too many syllables to be attractive to the average speaker.

Still, if no tape is involved, we shouldn’t imply otherwise.

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Patrick is a Christian with more than 27 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.