Grammar

Will You Watch Trump’s ‘State of the Uniom’?

Oops…there was a little problem with tickets to President Donald Trump’s big speech Tuesday night unless you’ve heard of the State of the Uniom.

The New York Times had the perfect headline for its report about a typo on tickets admitting people to the “State of the Uniom” on Tuesday: “The State of the Union Is … Misspelled”

That headline is a play on the line that’s almost always delivered fairly early in the annual presidential address to a joint session of Congress. Typically, the president will say something along the lines of, “The state of the Union is ‘strong,’” or some other modifier designed to make everyone feel great about the direction in which our nation is headed.

The blue tickets read:

115th Congress
Address to the Congress
on the
State of the Uniom
President Donald J. Trump

It’s the kind of typo that should never, ever happen. But I work in digital and given the number of words produced every day, I know all too well that typos will happen.

CBS News pointed out the error wasn’t made by the Trump Administration, but rather the sergeant at arms in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The classic response when such an error occurs is generally some snide question about spellcheck. Spellcheck should have caught this, unless the printing program that composed the tickets didn’t have a spellcheck option.

The tickets are provided for spouses and guests of members of Congress and give access to seats in the gallery.

The typo allowed for some humor on social media.

Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican, joked that he was ready for the big speech:

Rep. Raul M. Grijalva, a Democrat, decided to place blame in a different place:

Betsy DeVos is the U.S. Secretary of Education. I imagine she didn’t find the joke all that funny.

The best tweet I saw, however, might be this one:

At least we can all unite as a nation once in a while.

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Patrick is a Christian with more than 27 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.