Life

3 Ways to Protect Your Pets on July 4th

Barbecue, patriotic marches and fireworks. Those are traditions nearly everyone enjoys every Fourth of July. But pets don’t always find as much to like on that holiday.

In fact, more animals go missing every July 4th than any other day of the year. The primary reason? Those eye-popping fireworks that mesmerize so many can terrorize dogs and cats who don’t understand the festive nature of the occasion.

Here are a few things you should keep in mind to keep your pets happier when it’s time for fireworks:

1. Don’t take your pets to July 4th events, especially those in which fireworks will be happening. The strangers, the noise and the constant distractions can seriously stress out Fido and make him miserable. It can even make his behavior unpredictable.

2. Keep your dogs and cats safe indoors if possible. Let them stay indoors during the height of fireworks in the neighborhood, playing the television or music loudly enough to help drown out the sounds so they’ll stay more calm. If left outside without you around, an errant firework could scare them enough that they’d try to runaway to escape a perceived danger.

3. Never let your pets get near fireworks. Dogs are curious and playful; when you throw a firework, they want to fetch, or at least see what it is you just threw. And if they reach it before it explodes, they could be seriously injured. (And many fireworks contain toxic chemicals.)

Just a few simple steps can make sure your pets are just as happy on the fifth of July!

10 Comments

  1. I would never take my cats to see the fireworks even if I went as a “civilian”, so to speak. I go as an EMT, so no pets on the rig. But I do remember as a child going to see fireworks – the professional kind – at the Hills’ house. The had two airedales that they sedated and kept inside the house, with loud music on, just to get through the holiday. Fortunately my cats are completely indifferent to both fireworks and thunderstorms, which typically upset dogs more. My parents’ dogs were never upset by this, but some of the dogs they babysit are more high-strung and really get frightened by that.

    This is excellent advice!

  2. I would never take my cats to see the fireworks even if I went as a “civilian”, so to speak. I go as an EMT, so no pets on the rig. But I do remember as a child going to see fireworks – the professional kind – at the Hills’ house. The had two airedales that they sedated and kept inside the house, with loud music on, just to get through the holiday. Fortunately my cats are completely indifferent to both fireworks and thunderstorms, which typically upset dogs more. My parents’ dogs were never upset by this, but some of the dogs they babysit are more high-strung and really get frightened by that.

    This is excellent advice!

  3. Patrick, have you seen this video? http://youtu.be/0IXUgUeAPzg It makes me sick just watching it. I have a dachshund at home and all I can think of is what would have happened to this little guy if he’d picked up the firework in the wrong way. I can’t imagine why you would ever let your dog run free when you’re setting off fireworks in your yard. Hopefully people realize the potential danger of the holiday and keep their pets safe, healthy, and happy.

    1. @annedreshfield I will have to pass on watching that video – just reading what little you wrote is upsetting enough. One of my parents’ dogs, Ollie, was a dachshund, and we had lost him early in June… But we’d never have allowed him outside while setting off fireworks. Never…

      1.  @AislíngeKelloggdeGómez  @annedreshfield The dachshund is okay, as is everyone else in the area, but it’s still upsetting to watch. I think the little guy though it was something to play with. It makes me sick that his owners would let him run freely with fireworks lit and going off. Though, they have several dogs around, a lot of people standing around the lit fireworks, and it looks like it’s in a dry field with trailers/small homes, so it sounds like they’re not the smartest people, anyway…

    2.  @annedreshfield I actually hadn’t seen that video, but was a little apprehensive about watching it because I thought it was going to show a dog being seriously injured. Still, I can’t imagine that no one didn’t get that Roman Candle from the dog…it could have been a disaster!  Thanks for sharing that!

    3.  @annedreshfield I actually hadn’t seen that video, but was a little apprehensive about watching it because I thought it was going to show a dog being seriously injured. Still, I can’t imagine that no one didn’t get that Roman Candle from the dog…it could have been a disaster!  Thanks for sharing that!

Leave a Response

We'd love to hear from you, but remember all comments must be respectful. We reserve the right to remove comments that do not follow our comment guidelines. Click here to review our comment policy.

Your name, as provided, will display on the website with any comment you leave. Your email address and your browser’s IP address does not display publicly and we do not share or sell your email address or IP address to anyone.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Patrick is a Christian with more than 28 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.