Life

Chick-Fil-A Controversy: Can’t I Just Eat My Lunch?

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Last Updated on March 15, 2018

“Guilty as charged.” Three simple words caused an inexplicable controversy for restaurant chain Chick-Fil-A during an interview with the company’s president, Dan Cathey with the Christian news site Baptist Press.

The response followed a question about the company’s well-known stance on same-sex marriage and long-standing practice of donating to Christian groups that promote the biblical definition of marriage.

And it’s that well-publicized, sometime-criticized history that makes the controversy so inexplicable to begin with: the LGBT community is suddenly outraged by this interview? They’re the ones who’ve been complaining about Chick-Fil-A for years; there should be nothing surprising about Cathey’s admission. Perhaps what is surprising to them — and to others who aren’t part of that community — is the fact that Cathey didn’t back down from what he’s been saying he believed all along when given a potential opportunity to do so. This is to say, he stood behind his actions and stood up for his beliefs.

That’s exactly what people on the other side of the issue demand respect for when they do it, isn’t it? If you’re only going to support one side for doing that, you’re engaging in double standards.

Social Media Backlash
It took almost no time for the firestorm to begin on Twitter and Facebook. Some couldn’t resist claiming the chain had lost them as “loyal customers.” If the customers were truly so “loyal,” one wonders how they’d never heard the complaining about the restaurant’s donation history before.

But a look across a Twitterstream or a Facebook news feed reveals plenty of little gems:

Just complained to the manager at our local Chick-Fil-A that my chicken sandwich tasted like homophobia and that I wanted my money back.

Equality is a dish best served no where near a Chick-fil-A.

Chick-fil-A, I’ll miss your tea, & crunchy bits on the sides of the chicken, but I can’t live in denial anymore. PS your cows are lesbians.

Turns out the cows who can’t spell “Eat More Chicken” correctly aren’t the most ignorant people working for Chick-Fil-A.

Not all of the backlash, of course, is negative:

I personally admire Chick-fil-A for really backing their beliefs. It’s so rare that you find people in the business world that will do that.

If you’ve decided not to eat Chick-Fil-A because they stood up for what they believe, then you don’t deserve their delicious chicken

I support chick-fil-a in making their own decisions in who they choose to support and not falling subject to social norms

Whoever owns chick-Fil-a , is a true Christian. That’s why their food so good. God blesses their food.

Chick-Fil-A itself posted a message on its Facebook page. Here’s what the corporation had to say:

The Chick-fil-A culture and service tradition in our restaurants is to treat every person with honor, dignity and respect – regardless of their belief, race, creed, sexual orientation or gender. We will continue this tradition in the over 1,600 Restaurants run by independent Owner/Operators. Going forward, our intent is to leave the policy debate over same-sex marriage to the government and political arena.

Chick-fil-A is a family-owned and family-led company serving the communities in which it operates. From the day Truett Cathy started the company, he began applying biblically-based principles to managing his business. For example, we believe that closing on Sundays, operating debt-free and devoting a percentage of our profits back to our communities are what make us a stronger company and Chick-fil-A family.

Our mission is simple: to serve great food, provide genuine hospitality and have a positive influence on all who come in contact with Chick-fil-A.

I “liked” that post on Facebook, and a friend of mine from high school said he was shocked that I could like such a statement.

There are a few reasons I chose to click “Like” in response to the restaurant’s post: first, like some of the supporters above, I at least respect the fact that they’re not trying to back pedal or deny what’s already obvious. Second, I appreciate their intent not to actively discriminate against anyone in their establishments. Third, and perhaps most of all, I like the fact that they say they intend to leave the policy debate to the government and political arena. Because, really, that’s where it belongs.

I don’t go to Chick-Fil-A because it’s known as a “Christian restaurant” or because it supports the “traditional definition” of marriage. Honestly, that doesn’t enter into it at all.

I go because I like the food. Period.

My friend took issue with that argument as well:

“You go for the food?
Well I love the colors black and red together but I am not going to wear a Swastika. “

But that doesn’t mean that he won’t continue to wear black and red in some other configuration. Apples and oranges.

I do understand his bigger point: he feels that because Chick-Fil-A donates to “anti-gay” groups, he won’t spend a penny of his own money there. And I absolutely and totally respect his position on that, just as I respect Chick-Fil-A’s owner’s stance on their beliefs.

Bigger Questions, Bigger Points
I’ve made my own position on gay marriage clear in the past, I think. But for those who have missed it, I’ll be glad to say it again, perhaps more succinctly: I wish everyone would meet in the middle and compromise on the acceptance of “civil unions.” Christians don’t like changing the definition of “marriage” because that’s Biblical. There’s a core of resistance there that will never back down on that. Some of those same people may well agree to the same thing with a different name. I’ve seen statistics that show that more voters are likely to approve “civil unions.” But there’s a core of resistance in the LGBT community that likewise refuses to back down from its insistence that anything less than “marriage” is unacceptable.

People on both sides want it their way and only their way. That’s not how progress happens, folks.

The controversy is supposed to be about legal rights and legal recognition. It certainly isn’t about love: people don’t love each other more just because a marriage ceremony ends. Civil unions would solve the legal issues. The controversy is being co-opted into a “separate but equal” argument, but in this case, our society already has different classes of marriage: ever heard of “common law marriage”? Depending on the state, it requires no ceremony, no Christian presence whatsoever. Even an intentional marriage performed between man and woman doesn’t require any Christian affiliation. Marriage, therefore, need not have anything whatsoever to do with the church itself.

I’m a Christian, so I understand that homosexual acts are a sin according to the Bible. I also understand, from just simple observation, that the Christian community as a whole has for years placed a disproportionate amount of scorn on the gay community. The Bible lists a host of acts of equal rank as homosexuality.&nbsp Gays, it seems, are “too easy” a target for the church; I don’t think that’s right and I certainly don’t think it’s what God intended.

The other issue that troubles me, though, is the branding of Christian groups to which Chick-Fil-A has donated as “hate groups.” &nbsp “Hate” and “anti-gay-marriage” are not automatically synonymous. It’s much the same as the “pro-life” title for abortion opponents: people who support a woman’s right to choose are not automatically “pro-death,” but just feel that it should be up to the couple, not strangers, as to what a couple decides. To say that Chick-Fil-A supports “hate groups” feels deceitful to me, and I resent that characterization as a Christian who is called upon to uphold certain standards without hating anyone.

I also have yet to satisfactorily resolve the issue of same-sex attraction: I do not believe that one chooses to be gay. I base this on common sense: no straight person has ever been able to tell me the date on which he or she decided to be heterosexual. And if you honestly believe that people who are attracted to the same rather than opposite gender make a conscious choice to do so against their own nature, then you logically must believe that you could have just as easily made the choice to be attracted to the same gender yourself. It’s hard to find people who’d admit that, too.

The only “choice” when it comes to homosexuality is acting on it. But I don’t think there is any real choice when it comes to the gender to which you are attracted. I just can’t see how there could be.

I have nothing against anyone who decides that because Chick-Fil-A donates to organizations that speak out against same-sex marriage, they won’t patronize it. Really. I absolutely respect them and their point of view. But I won’t judge anyone who eats there knowing this, either.

Am I betraying my own beliefs by eating there? I don’t feel that I am, because I don’t feel that I make enough of a difference in sa. I know today’s society is boycott-happy, and if you want to be part of that kind of attitude, have at it. I happen to believe that I can reach more people with a post like this on this blog than will ever notice my absence from a drive-through line at a restaurant that’s bringing in customers like gangbusters. And in speaking out and discussing things in this manner, I hope I’ve at least had a bigger impact on how people at least think about such things than I would by going to, say, McDonald’s for lunch instead.

We all have to choose not only which battles we’re interested and willing to fight but the most effective way of waging that battle; what seems the right path for one person will not be right for another. Surely we can all give each other a little latitude in making those determinations for ourselves, can’t we?

Will I still eat at Chick-Fil-A once in a while? Absolutely. Because of the food. That’s the only reason anyone should ever go to a restaurant.

the authorPatrick
Patrick is a Christian with more than 30 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.

39 Comments

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  • @Erin I don’t want you to think I’m ignoring your post by my lack of response. To the contrary, I’ve been pondering exactly how to respond to your rude tone without returning the disrepect you showed me. The saddest thing is that you actually chose to remind everyone that God challenges us to stand against things “IN LOVE,” then chose to apparently ignore those two words in your response to me. Apparently your definition of speaking in love to someone is far different from my own. How sad this is.

  • @Erin I don’t want you to think I’m ignoring your post by my lack of response. To the contrary, I’ve been pondering exactly how to respond to your rude tone without returning the disrepect you showed me. The saddest thing is that you actually chose to remind everyone that God challenges us to stand against things “IN LOVE,” then chose to apparently ignore those two words in your response to me. Apparently your definition of speaking in love to someone is far different from my own. How sad this is.

  • ok Just a total off topic comment. Patrick I would love it if you could add likes/dislikes to comments made, Just a friendly thought.

    • Erin, I had to temporarily take Livefyre offline because of an error. When it returns, the “Like” functionality will be back as well. Thanks for the suggestion.

  • I started off really liking this because I feel the same way as this statment you made. “That’s exactly what people on the other side of the issue demand respect for when they do it, isn’t it? If you’re only going to support one side for doing that, you’re engaging in double standards”
    But then, you showed your just the kind of Christian that GLBT (hope thats right) LOVE. One who wont truely stand up for what they believe. You have your feet, one on each side of the fence. And I totally Disagree with this Statement “….so I understand that homosexual acts are a sin according to the Bible. I also understand, from just simple observation, that the Christian community as a whole has for years placed a disproportionate amount of scorn on the gay community. The Bible lists a host of acts of equal rank as homosexuality. Gays, it seems, are “too easy” a target for the church; I don’t think that’s right and I certainly don’t think it’s what God intended”
    The Christian Community as a whole is called to stand against ALL sin, THAT’s what God intends, IN LOVE, BUT without compromising what is right and thats a very hard thing we are called to do but WE ARE. And since the Gay community is fighting for rights, such as wanting to force all to call their “unions” marriage, its not like they are an easy target, they are just bringing attention on them selves so they are being responded to. Just like when pedophiles or theives bring attention to themselves, They get responded to. And so just one question if Christians are showing a “disproportionate amount” just what is the right amount? That part of your statment really confuses me.

    Your own words show your inability to make a clear choice, well except to say you agree with both sides, on an issue that is clearly not one you can agree with both sides. Unless you are an apolegetic christian or an apologetic Gay person.

    Maybe your logical logic is not as logical as you think it is. The bible makes not apologies and has very clear lines.

    Sorry I don’t have time right now to further “discuss” this but I have 5 kids and its summer time so they are all here and all wanting my attention right now 🙂 Hopefully I can come back later. Also I see you have a dislike for bad grammar and as a home schooling mom I agree, but as a MS patient I must say I know I’m not perfect and sometimes my thoughts get mixed or my spelling is less than perfect so I’m hoping your reading this for the message not to critique it like an assignment I’m turning in 🙂

  • @patricksplace another thought… let’s start a “logic pride” movement and call anyone using irrational arguments a hater. 😛

  • @patricksplace Being against the changing of an institution that’s part of your religion =/= hating people.

    • @TomFrankly That’s definitely true. Unfortunately, a lot of Christians choose to make it personal when they shouldn’t.

    • @TomFrankly That’s definitely true. Unfortunately, a lot of Christians choose to make it personal when they shouldn’t.

  • The middle ground.
     
    I think that only a very small number of organization that are against marriage equality are labeled “hate” groups and that is because of their methods and not of their beliefs. Likewise, I believe that only a small number of LGBT people hate religion because they see them as the oppressors.
     
    But they are the most vocal groups, they are the ones that TV news programs interview. Tell me when was the last time you saw an interview on TV about marriage equality where a religious leader came on a news show and take a neutral position or a positive view on marriage. During the testimony for gender inclusive anti-discrimination bill we had an Episcopal Bishop speak in favor of our bill, but the news only interviewed a priest and a minster that were against the bill. The media loves conflict, they don’t want two people sitting there agreeing with one another.
     
    But you also have to understand what it is like to be LGBT and the discrimination that you face every day. Day in, day out. What it is like to walk into a store and not know how you will be treated. One night when I was walking from a restaurant to theater, this woman passed me by, turned back and followed me, she was shouting that I was damned and going to hell quoting passages from the bible. She kept it up until the crosswalk light changed and I crossed the street.
     
    A lesbian couple was telling me the other day about their train ride from NYC, her partner fell asleep on her shoulder and she could hear some kids on the train asking “why do they allow ####### on the train?” Even through other people on the train spoke up for them, it still stung.
     
    Or reading the news online and reading that an organization like the FRC said in support of the Uganda bill to make homosexuality a capital offense that it is the true solution to homosexuals. How would you feel after reading that about yourself?
     
    Yes, we do have a radical element, but the vast majority are quietly working behind the scenes for equality. When we passed the marriage equality and the gender inclusive anti-discrimination bills we had over 100 churches in support of the bills, but they never made the headlines. Through my work to pass the gender inclusive anti-discrimination bill, I got to know many priests, pastors, ministers and rabbis who supported our bill.
     
    I don’t hate, life is too short to hate. I see all these people out there hating one another and I think what a waste of their lives.

    • @DianaCT Diana, I’m curious about something that I’m not sure I understand: why would anyone treat you differently when you walk into a store? One’s sexual orientation need not be obvious or advertised to begin with; why would there be an assumption that you were going to be treated differently somehow?

    • @DianaCT Diana, I’m curious about something that I’m not sure I understand: why would anyone treat you differently when you walk into a store? One’s sexual orientation need not be obvious or advertised to begin with; why would there be an assumption that you were going to be treated differently somehow?

      • @patricksplace@DianaCT
        Yes they do. I joke that if you cannot tell that I am transgender within 10 feet you need new glasses and a hearing aid. Older people usually cannot tell, but people in their teens and twenties usually can “read” me right away. With some people you can tell the moment that they read me. When I was in an accident and had to go an auto repair shop, I could tell the moment the owner knew I was trans. His eye widen and he took a step backward; however, by the time we were finished talking he was relaxed and back within normal speaking comfort zone. I had a different experience when I was in a Boston Market restaurant when one of the counter kids stepped away from the counter and went in the back and what looked like all the other employees came out and stared at me. One male employee walked with a limped wrist, laughing.
         
        I have friend who slipped and fell on some ice and when they brought her to the emergency room and they found out that she was trans, they stopped working on her and stepped away. She could hear them talking about her, says “it” when they were referring to her. They sent her home without treating her (no x-rays, MRIs, nothing) telling her to take two aspirin. She called her doctor and he sent her to another hospital where they found her back broken in 3 places. To this day she is in constant pain (the hospital settled out of court).
         
        Another friend was thrown out of a bar because she was making the other patron uncomfortable (the bar lost it liquor license for 30 days and was fined by the CT Human Rights Commission).
         
        As I said, 99.999% of the people just don’t care; most businesses don’t care as long as the color of your money is green. Maybe once a year some idiot makes a comment, but most people are friendly. I don’t demand acceptance, but I do ask to be treated like you would treat anyone else.

        • @DianaCT And you absolutely have every right to expect to be treated like everyone else. I’m at least glad that in the other cases, the businesses who intentionally mistreated people were held accountable for it. I think that should happen a LOT more often.

        • @DianaCT And you absolutely have every right to expect to be treated like everyone else. I’m at least glad that in the other cases, the businesses who intentionally mistreated people were held accountable for it. I think that should happen a LOT more often.

        • @patricksplace@DianaCT
          Next week I am a guest speaker at a summit on bullying and discrimination at the Legislative Office Building that is sponsored by the Connecticut’s Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities and The Office of Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities for school administrators.
           
          I am nervous as all heck. I have been practicing delivering my speech without reading it.

        • @patricksplace@DianaCT
          Next week I am a guest speaker at a summit on bullying and discrimination at the Legislative Office Building that is sponsored by the Connecticut’s Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities and The Office of Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities for school administrators.
           
          I am nervous as all heck. I have been practicing delivering my speech without reading it.

      • @patricksplace@DianaCT
        Yes they do. I joke that if you cannot tell that I am transgender within 10 feet you need new glasses and a hearing aid. Older people usually cannot tell, but people in their teens and twenties usually can “read” me right away. With some people you can tell the moment that they read me. When I was in an accident and had to go an auto repair shop, I could tell the moment the owner knew I was trans. His eye widen and he took a step backward; however, by the time we were finished talking he was relaxed and back within normal speaking comfort zone. I had a different experience when I was in a Boston Market restaurant when one of the counter kids stepped away from the counter and went in the back and what looked like all the other employees came out and stared at me. One male employee walked with a limped wrist, laughing.
         
        I have friend who slipped and fell on some ice and when they brought her to the emergency room and they found out that she was trans, they stopped working on her and stepped away. She could hear them talking about her, says “it” when they were referring to her. They sent her home without treating her (no x-rays, MRIs, nothing) telling her to take two aspirin. She called her doctor and he sent her to another hospital where they found her back broken in 3 places. To this day she is in constant pain (the hospital settled out of court).
         
        Another friend was thrown out of a bar because she was making the other patron uncomfortable (the bar lost it liquor license for 30 days and was fined by the CT Human Rights Commission).
         
        As I said, 99.999% of the people just don’t care; most businesses don’t care as long as the color of your money is green. Maybe once a year some idiot makes a comment, but most people are friendly. I don’t demand acceptance, but I do ask to be treated like you would treat anyone else.

  • I didn’t have time to comment on this on Friday and was away on Saturday again but I’ll give my 2 cents now.
     
    I can agree that sticking to one’s convictions can be an admirable thing to do. I should point out that I also think that keeping an open mind, continuing to listen to other opinions and changing your mind as your point of view evolves can be admirable.  
     
    In this particular situation, I have a different point of view than you do, Patrick, and I believe it is because I view this as a civil rights issue. Since Chick-Fil-A chooses to donate money to anti-gay groups (which is totally their right),  I will choose not to eat at their restaurants. This is my way of voicing my own opinion, you see.  (In the interest of total disclosure, I will also point out that that this will not be a difficult thing for me to do as there is no Chick-Fil-A located near me. I still would not eat there, however, if there were one around.)  
     
    I think that if you view this as a civil rights issue, you can easily see anti-gay organizations as hate groups.  I do agree with you that  not all people who are members of such organizations – or agree with what they stand for- are people who “hate” LGBT individuals but once you start justifying treating other people differently because of their race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation (or anything else that they have no control over)  then it is just a hop, skip and a jump to bigotry.  If you examine history, you’ll see that when human beings focus on what makes us different from each other instead of what we have in common intolerance is bound to follow.  Call it human nature.
     
    This brings up the point you raised about this being a Christian issue to some people.  I do not mean to insult anyone nor do I mean any disrespect but I really have to wonder how Christians decide what verses in the Bible to take to heart and which ones to ignore.  People quote Leviticus 18:22 as a reason to discriminate against gay and lesbian people but ignore Leviticus 11:10 which clearly states that eating shellfish is an abomination.  I know of no one who treats women as “unclean” during their menstrual  period as described  in Leviticus 15:19  and we do not stone adulterers to death as we are told in Leviticus 20:10. (In fact, we are outraged by news that this punishment is practiced in some countries today by people who are following their own holy book.)
     
    Frankly, I think that people will use verses in the Bible to justify what they wish to and will ignore verses that they don’t wish to follow.  After all, the Bible was used to justify slavery, wasn’t it?  

    •  @Cathryn (aka Strange) I don’t put a lot of weight on Leviticus, only because of the issue you speak of: that Christians have used it to “cherry pick” what they seem to be for or against. We uphold almost none of the punishments called for in that book, and it can be used to justify things that surely weren’t intended.  In 1 Corinthians 6, there is a series of sins that are essentially condemned and homosexuality is one of them. Too many Christians seem to refuse to acknowledge that it’s one of SEVERAL and too many seem to have LESS of a problem with those others, even though the point of the passage is to place all of these sins as being of EQUAL caliber.
       
      To your issue of civil rights, I agree with your points, and I think the crux of where we differ is that “edge” of “hate.”  I don’t see people who are against gay “marriage” as automatically being “haters” of homosexuals. It’s like saying that any church that is against gay marriage is an “anti-gay hate group.” That’s not what churches are — at least, aside from a few notable examples — it isn’t what churches are called by God to BE. But there’s too much of this “you’re either with us or against us” foolishness with too few actually trying to bridge the divide.  
       
      There’s a great deal we don’t understand about the gay community, and unfortunately, the straight community’s stubbornness and the gay community’s militance are working together to keep that separation strong. If more on both sides could get past the posturing and really get to know each other, I think they’d find a much broader, livable common ground.

      •  @patricksplace Perhaps what many people don’t understand about the LGBT community is that – other than their sexual orientation and/or identity – they are just like everyone else.  Seriously.  It’s just that one thing about them that everyone wants to focus on and it isn’t even the most important thing about them.  
         
        Human beings are human beings.
         
        We really aren’t all that different from each other, are we?

    •  @Cathryn (aka Strange) I don’t put a lot of weight on Leviticus, only because of the issue you speak of: that Christians have used it to “cherry pick” what they seem to be for or against. We uphold almost none of the punishments called for in that book, and it can be used to justify things that surely weren’t intended.  In 1 Corinthians 6, there is a series of sins that are essentially condemned and homosexuality is one of them. Too many Christians seem to refuse to acknowledge that it’s one of SEVERAL and too many seem to have LESS of a problem with those others, even though the point of the passage is to place all of these sins as being of EQUAL caliber.
       
      To your issue of civil rights, I agree with your points, and I think the crux of where we differ is that “edge” of “hate.”  I don’t see people who are against gay “marriage” as automatically being “haters” of homosexuals. It’s like saying that any church that is against gay marriage is an “anti-gay hate group.” That’s not what churches are — at least, aside from a few notable examples — it isn’t what churches are called by God to BE. But there’s too much of this “you’re either with us or against us” foolishness with too few actually trying to bridge the divide.  
       
      There’s a great deal we don’t understand about the gay community, and unfortunately, the straight community’s stubbornness and the gay community’s militance are working together to keep that separation strong. If more on both sides could get past the posturing and really get to know each other, I think they’d find a much broader, livable common ground.

  • My thoughts…
    First it is Chick-Fil-A right to donate to any organization that they want and second it is anyone right not patronize any business. If there was a Chick-Fil-A franchise in Connecticut, I probably wouldn’t go there to eat, but I don’t go to any fast food restaurant unless I have to (Like when I am traveling).
     
    It would be interesting if they did have a restaurant here in Connecticut to see if they would serve a same-sex couple or how they would treat me. My guess is that they would treat us like any other customer.
     
    I think that the government should start calling all marriages “civil unions” and require everyone to get a “civil union” and if a couple wanted to get married in a church that is OK, but first they would have to have a “civil union” ceremony like they do in Europe. The problem is if you have marriage and civil unions you are creating a situation where people can discriminate against gays and lesbians. Only 21 states have laws protecting lesbians and gays and only 16 states protect trans-people, in all the other states it is OK to discriminate against LGBT people. When Connecticut had civil unions, I know people who when asked about their marital status and they said “civil union” the clerk said “Oh you are one of those…”
     
    So I would say it is one or the other, marriage or civil unions, but not both. Separate is never equal.
     
    The SPLC labels a group a “hate group” if they fit the FBI definition of a group that their “primary purpose is to promote animosity, hostility, and malice against persons belonging to a race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or ethnicity/national origin…” Just being against LGBT issues does not qualify a group to be a “hate group.” Some of the groups that Chick-Fil-A has donate to such as the Family Research Council routinely call gays and trans-people pedophiles. In ads against gender inclusive anti-discrimination legislation the FRC has labeled the bill the “Bathroom Bill” or the “Pedophile Protection Act” and shows a grubby man going into the bathroom after a little girl enters it. Even though they know that there has not been one case where a person used the gender anti-discrimination laws to commit rape. The FRC also is lobbying for a bill in Uganda that makes being gay a capital offense. However, the “family values” organization that opposed the Connecticut gender inclusive anti-discrimination bill did not fit the FBI definition because they never used terminology that instilled animosity, hostility, and malice and therefore they are not labeled a hate group. So just being anti-LGBT does not make a group a “hate group.”
     

    •  @DianaCT I don’t know of a case of any Chick-Fil-A ever refusing to serve someone because of any reason.  Of course, if they acted like a jerk over the company’s policies, they may well be asked to leave, but even that doesn’t appear to have happened.I do understand the notion that “separate is never equal,” but I think there’s no question that separate is better than NOTHING, which is what gays and lesbians have in most states. There are some states that are probably decades away from changing that, but there are others that might vote for their legal protection if the question was asked in a certain way. In those cases, I think it’s far more important that people get their legal rights than that we get caught up semantics. For me, it’s a matter of choosing the battle.

  • Great post Patrick.  I’ll continue to eat there myself because I love the food.  The business model they have chosen was gutsy to say the least (being open 13% less days than their competitors, among other issues), but it has worked for them.
     
    I don’t beat up my friends who are in same-sex relationships, nor do they get snippy with me for being heterosexual.  That’s why they are still friends.  The choices we make are ours to make and ours to live with.
     
    All I ask is for folks to please leave ‘Chikin’ out of it and let me enjoy the best chicken sandwich on the planet by far.

    •  @Hammond It’s not only “gutsy,” it’s expensive. Many malls fine Chick-Fil-A for not opening on Sunday, and the company goes right on paying.

  • We live in an age where the definition of “Tolerance” has been changed. Instead of just respecting a person’s right to have a different view or opinion, militant segments DEMAND that we embrace, applaud and promote their point of view. While screaming, “Intolerance” they themselves are intolerant of anyone who dares to hold to tradition, conservative viewpoint.
     
    We are becoming a society where the desire to conform and be a part of the the crowd has replaced the will to stand up for our principles. A decadent society where the will to believe, to resist, to contend, to fight, to struggle, for right is gone.
     
    Billy Graham reminds us in todays devotional that this is what happened in Rome before the fall of the Roman Empire. “The same conditions that prevailed in Rome prevail in our society. Before Rome fell, her standards were abandoned, the family disintegrated, divorce prevailed, immorality was rampant, and faith was at a low ebb. As Gibbon said, “There was much talk of religion, but few practiced it.”” 
     
    I confess that, at times, when choosing between fast food places, I have opted for Chick-fil-a because I support who they are and what they stand for. It’s my money and I have the FREDOM to do that. But, if the chicken wasn’t good or the service was poor I would go somewhere else.
     
    Have you ever noticed that everyone thinks they are the experts on what others should do with their own money? Chick-fil-a has the right to spend it’s money as it sees fit. If you don’t like it, go somewhere else, that’s your right.
     
    I have found over the years that our patronage, or lack thereof, has little effect on the policies or philosophies of companies or organizations. So it comes down to a personal choice: is that what I want my money supporting? I’m not responsible for what others do with their money, I’m only responsible for what I do with mine.
     
    MY PRAYER FOR THE DAY:
    May I be worthy to bear the name “Christian”, Lord Jesus, and may I be willing to stand for and support what I believe is right, even in the face of persecution like Chick-fil-a is enduring. And like them, may I be loving and treat even those with whom I disagree with courtesy and compassion.
     

    •  @AGJ That’s another interesting point: I don’t really believe that boycotts do much to change how a company operates unless the boycott is massive in size.  These days, everyone wants us to boycott something every 10 minutes.  You can barely keep track of who we’re not supposed to be buying from at a given moment.  I’ve been by the Chick-Fil-A closest to my home a couple of times since this interview was published: it doesn’t appear a lack of LGBT customers has had any impact in the length of the lines so far.

      •  @patricksplace  @AGJ “These days, everyone wants us to boycott something every 10 minutes.” That is so true.
         
        Let’s see… we are supposed to boycott Wal-Mart, Exxon/Mobil, Target and a whole mess of places that I can’t ever remember any more.
         
        Maybe someone should develop an App so when you enter a store you can check to see who is boycotting it.

  • I have strong respect for people who are willing to stand up for their beliefs even when it costs them something, whether that’s a chicken sandwhich or a chicken sandwhich customer.

    •  @TedtheThird That respect SHOULD go both ways! Unfortunately, some want to take credit for standing up for their beliefs, but refuse to give someone who disagrees with them the same credit.

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