Life

Not So Sorry?

Three years ago this month, the Dixie Chicks were apologizing for remarks made at a London concert.

Lead singer Natalie Maines previously said she was ashamed that President Bush was from her home state of Texas. The remark led to a firestorm of controversy among country music fans, many of whom are Republican southerners, and many of whom demanded of local radio stations that the Dixie Chicks’ music be pulled off the airwaves.

And now, just when some radio stations are slowly setting aside the “grudge” against the group and are beginning to air their newest single, “Not Ready to Make Nice,” it appears that the apology might not have been so heartfelt.

With lyrics like, “I’m not ready to make nice. I’m not ready to back down. I’m still mad as hell and I don’t have time to go round and round and round,” “How in the world can the words that I said send somebody so over the edge,” and “I made my bed and I sleep like a baby,” it sounds as if the group doesn’t really care what their fans think.

They are perfectly within their right to say (and sing) what they like.

And if fans find the song a difficult pill to swallow, they’re well within their right to demand that the boycott start up all over again.

It’s fine for celebrities to let it all hang out when it comes to their personal beliefs. But when celebrities cross that line, they’re taking a risk. Not everyone who goes to a country music concert wants to participate in an anti-war rally. Some people — this may be hard for you to believe — go to a concert to hear music!

If an outspoken celebrity’s comments put off a large portion of the audience to the point that the celebrity feels compelled to issue anything in the way of an apology to maintain good PR with their fans, it seems a little “flip-floppy” to then produce a song that makes it clear that they don’t care what anyone thinks about their position.

If they were “sleeping like a baby” in the bed they made, they needn’t have apologized to begin with, right? If they didn’t care how people interpreted the comment, there would have been no reason to do anything other than allow the original comment to stand as delivered.

It’s one thing to stick to your guns about something you consider vitally important. But if you express regret for your method, then later take an action that knocks the apology right off the table, what message are you really sending?

the authorPatrick
Patrick is a Christian with more than 30 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.

4 Comments

  • I used to be a fan…but now I’m ashamed that their from my home state of Texas. And most of all, I’m ashamed that they consider themselves Americans.

  • absolutely, but i guess i am a little bit more willing to give people space in the process…not all of us are able to know right this minute exactly what our beliefs are worth to us…and sometimes what it’s worth to us changes over time. i think this particular war has shown such a process in many citizens, public and private.

  • perhaps you are sending the message that your agent made you apologize, but since you’ve had time to reflect, you realize that what you said was what you meant, and that your work is about more than pandering to the masses.

    Entirely possible, Rachel Anne.

    If it’s true, it’s unfortunate that they’d allow anyone else to “force” them to apologize for comments they didn’t want to apologize for. After all, if they felt that the statement itself was important enough to risk the scorn, they should have been willing to accept the scorn; if it wasn’t important enough for that, why stir up the pot again now?

  • perhaps you are sending the message that your agent made you apologize, but since you’ve had time to reflect, you realize that what you said was what you meant, and that your work is about more than pandering to the masses.

    perhaps.

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