Tech & The Web

Why You Should Check Your Email Security Right Now

Stockfresh

Hackers published email addresses and passwords of hundreds of thousands of users obtained from an old data file, Yahoo! confirmed on Thursday.

While the internet company was quick to point out that of the data released, only about 5% of the email addresses and password combinations listed were still valid. That’s enough to give you pause to breathe a sigh of relief until you begin wondering if your email is in that five percent.

But what’s particularly interesting is email addresses from companies besides Yahoo! were affected.  The company is working with other internet email providers like Gmail and Hotmail to notify customers whose information may be compromised.

In the meantime, I followed this link to check my email address’s relative safety; while my Yahoo! email address, which I rarely use these days, came up in the clear, my primary email address, a Gmail account, returned an alert that it had been mentioned in the file.

I don’t know if that means that the email address and password were posted for the web to see, but I immediately reset my password.

I’ve since scanned other email addresses I recall having at different points, and none appear to be included; but it bothers me that my primary, non-Yahoo address turned up — somehow — in an old Yahoo! data file.

Your Turn:

Run your email address(es) through the quick checker linked above: does your email show up as potentially compromised? If so, is it a Yahoo or non-Yahoo account?

Loading spinner

9 Comments

  1. @patricksplace LOL… NO ONE would want to read my boring emails, unless they need a Diabetes For Dummies (not a real thing) newsletter. 😉

    Loading spinner
    1. @ondinemonet I don’t believe that for a second! You’re not boring at all, friend! 🙂

      Loading spinner
  2. @patricksplace LOL… NO ONE would want to read my boring emails, unless they need a Diabetes For Dummies (not a real thing) newsletter. 😉

    Loading spinner
  3. None of my email addresses match the list, so I’m good as far as that’s concerned.
     
    One system I have found useful is to create and memorize an 8 to 12 digit string (mixing in caps) of numbers and letters, such as 74knseT3Rp, and then adding the first letter from the name of the site into that string, like so: 74knseT3Rpf for Facebook, 74knseT3Rpg for Gmail, and so forth. Even if one such password is exposed, it’s useless on any other site you use.

    Loading spinner
  4. Thanks for sharing this!  It appears that my email(s) and K’s are just fine.  That’s really unnerving that an account with another company could be compromised like that!!  I’m not sure what to think of it!

    Loading spinner
  5. Wel that’s disturbing isn’t it? Thanks for sharing the info! Luckily my email addresses were not affected! Greg information!!

    Loading spinner
  6. Wel that’s disturbing isn’t it? Thanks for sharing the info! Luckily my email addresses were not affected! Greg information!!

    Loading spinner

Comments are closed.

Patrick is a Christian with more than 29 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.