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Not a Good TV Night if You’re Sick of Haiti

Stockfresh

If you’ve reach the point of “disaster fatigue” and don’t want to hear anything tonight about the crisis in Haiti, tonight will be a good night to keep the television turned off.

That’s because a mammoth number of networks are airing Hope for Haiti Now, a global telethon designed to raise money for relief efforts.

You’ll find it at 8:00pm tonight on — ready for this list?

ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, The CW, CNN, BET, VH1, CMT, the networks of MTV and CNN International. There are probably others in the mix, too, but let’s face it: this list is formidable enough on its own.

The growing list of stars include Beyonce, Madonna, Brad Pitt, Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Clint Eastwood, Denzel Washington, Halle Berry, Jon Stewart, Julia Roberts, Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Meryl Streep, Morgan Freeman, Nicole Kidman, Robert Pattinson, Samuel L. Jackson, Tom Hanks and Will Smith. George Clooney will host in Los Angeles, with Wyclef Jean in New York and Anderson Cooper in Haiti.

I haven’t seen Kanye West on the list, but if so, I doubt he’ll be speaking out about how Barack Obama hates black people.

Just sayin’.

1 Comment

  1. I know it’s terrible of me to say, but I am sick of hearing about Haiti. The impact of this tragedy is enormous and on-going, and not to be belittled, but the media attention is exhausting. I’m still recovering from the 500 megaton news cycle caused by Michael Jackson’s death.

    My cynical side cannot help but feel that a lot of these celebrities are performing or appearing primarily to keep their names in the spotlight and on headlines. I guarantee you that if this media hoopla wasn’t put together in the name of such a serious tragedy, we’d be witnessing one type of pseudo-deviant exhibition or another during the event. After all, we can’t get through an awards ceremony these days without someone acting like an ass to make headlines. Kanye West, Adam Lambert… Here’s looking at you, kid.

    I’m not as much tired of hearing about the suffering in Haiti as I am about the lackluster job of getting the help to the people. According to one Texas news source, there were 80 engineers and medical personnel ready to deploy to Haiti from Texas alone, and they were told not to, because supposedly there’s sufficient manpower in Haiti already. Yet at the same time I am seeing report after report about how supplies are sitting on a dock somewhere in Haiti and somehow not finding their way where they need to be.

    It is a shame that paperclips are so expensive that funds for rescue missions cannot be set aside before hand; instead, each time something like this happens, we seem to start from scratch. It takes days to get help on the ground, as the first few are spent wondering where the money’s going to come from.

    I guess what it comes down to is this: if the media and celebrities can get to Haiti and we can see fresh images 24/7 of victims buried under rubble, then why is it so difficult for the actual help to reach there? Why am I constantly reading articles about how help is sitting at the docks because they can’t get to where they’re supposed to – although no one seems to know why.

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Patrick is a Christian with more than 30 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.