TV & Entertainment

‘The Jerry Springer Show’ Ends Production…We Think

After 27 years, ‘The Jerry Springer Show’ seems to have gone out of production, though there’s no official word that it’s actually canceled.

It’s news that may sadden far too many and delight far too few: it appears The Jerry Springer Show has been canceled.

Note that I said “it appears.” As of this writing, whether it actually is or isn’t officially canceled isn’t exactly clear.

Here’s what we know so far: Springer’s show hit the airwaves in 1991 as just another of many talk shows springing up. (Pardon the pun.) But it soon distanced itself from the typical talk format. ScreenRant.com said it quite well:

In the hands of Springer, the once-sedate talk show became something closer to a pro wrestling event crossed with a circus sideshow.

The audience expressed exaggerated shock and outrage as the guests revealed the details of whatever plight they faced. Security stood by as their chief adversaries walked out on stage and the violent confrontations erupted. The audience cheered even louder, chanting, “Jerry! Jerry! Jerry!” during the melees.

But after nearly 4,000 episodes — if you can imagine — Springer’s show appeared to have ceased production. The CW recently signed on the dotted line to carry the program on its official network lineup starting this fall. The episodes slated to run will be a mix of preproduced originals and reruns. But no new shows are apparently on the schedule.

At least, so far.

The CW has the option to call for additional new shows to be produced. So the show could return to production.

But US Weekly reported the show already held its series wrap party and that the show’s staff was laid off from their jobs, which would seem to suggest that it’s over.

The program is expected to continue airing reruns in the various stations that purchased it in syndication.

Some marvel that the show lasted for 27 years, while others of us understand exactly why it did: people watched.

Even Springer called it a ‘stupid’ show.

There’s the ever-present criticism of television appealing to the lowest-common denominator, and shows like Springer’s certainly could be said to help give weight to such arguments.

It’s a curious double standard: people inherently don’t like censorship, but simultaneously wish such programs would never see the light of day. They suggest that no “reputable” station would air such drivel. But in secret, some of those very same people didn’t miss the chance to tune in.

It’s also a testament to the free-market system, which lets the market decide what’s a success. Should it be the kind of program beamed into people’s living rooms? I’ll put it this way: I didn’t watch it. But then I doubt I’m the target audience for it anyway because I’m no longer in college and I don’t care for beer.

To his credit, Springer never pretended it was top-tier programming.

“No one should watch this show for counseling,” he told Inside Edition in 1997. “In fact, if you watch the show, you should get counseling.”

But he has long taken the criticism in stride, even agreeing with it.

“Look, the show’s stupid. Don’t watch it. That’s why God gave us remote controls,” he told US Weekly.

Of course, having remote controls doesn’t automatically mean people will use them to switch to quality. More’s the pity.

Would you miss ‘The Jerry Springer Show’ if it were to disappear completely? How often do you watch?

2 Comments

  1. Ah, the lowest common denominator – that’s always my favourite way of describing what’s on the telly. Then, now, in the future, the boob tube will continue to cater to lowest lowest common denominator, no matter what. And those of us who refuse to partake in this refuse will still be outnumbered by the lowest common denominators. Frightening, isn’t it?

    As I’m sure you can imagine, I would debase myself to watch any of that drivel, not Springer’s stuff, not sitcoms, none of that junk. There isn’t an existing word that appropriately describes such terrible viewing as that. I prefer Netflix with its multitude of David Attenborough’s shows than almost anything else – except Pixar, Dreamworks, and Illumination films. Oh, and Outlander, being Scottish and Irish.

  2. Ah, the lowest common denominator – that’s always my favourite way of describing what’s on the telly. Then, now, in the future, the boob tube will continue to cater to lowest lowest common denominator, no matter what. And those of us who refuse to partake in this refuse will still be outnumbered by the lowest common denominators. Frightening, isn’t it?

    As Kim sure you can imagine, I would debase myself to watch any of that drivel, not Springer’s stuff, not sitcoms, none of that junk. There isn’t an existing word that appropriately describes such terrible viewing as that. I prefer Netflix with its multitude of David Attenborough’s shows than almost anything else – except Pixar, Dreamworks, and Illumination films. Oh, and Outlander, being Scottish and Irish.

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Patrick is a Christian with more than 27 years experience in professional writing, producing and marketing. His professional background also includes social media, reporting for broadcast television and the web, directing, videography and photography. He enjoys getting to know people over coffee and spending time with his dog.